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Librarians & Grassroots Organizers: The Unsung Heroes of the Opioid Crisis

As the United States struggles with the ongoing opioid crisis, there are many surprising people on the frontlines fighting to save lives.

The most surprising among them all are librarians.  From Philadelphia to San Francisco to Denver and even in small towns in our nation’s heartland, local libraries have become prime locations for addicts to use, buy and sell opioid drugs.  Notably, librarians at The Free Library of Philadelphia in McPherson Square Park have been trained in administering naloxone nasal spray, which helps revive users when then overdose.

Also fighting the opioid crisis are grassroots organizers who are forming various support groups within their communities.  Among them are Lori Erion, an Ohio mother who’s a recovering alcoholic who also has a daughter who’s a recovering heroin addict.  She formed the group Families of Addicts which educates families on addiction warning signs and provides of forum of positive reinforcement, even in times of relapse.

 

Erica Banas is a Digital Content Manager that covers rock/classic rock news for Beasley Media Group.